Posts Tagged advertising

Vintage Postcards Transport The Viewer To Another Time

17 September 2010

Here is your trivia word for the day: Deltiology, the study and collection of postcards .  Not that it is trivial to the millions of post card collectors all over the world.  Haunt enough auctions buying up odd box lots and you are sure to end up with a collection of old postcards.  Do not take them lightly.  When they arrived on the scene in the 1860’s they were a rather utilitarian item.  They provided a cheap means of communicating a short, informal, message.  Think, the Twitter of the letter writing era.  Later on they became a virtual art and photography publishing medium.  Post cards became collectible in short order and the variety of images gave them an appeal to people with a wide variety of interests.

My favorite postcards have always been the transportation scenes, especially aircraft, ships and trains.  The amount of available material for collecting is unbelievable.  The early real photo postcards form an illustrated history that often includes events or vehicles not well recorded in books.

Cards featuring aviation related subjects may have photos of aviation pioneers or rare experimental aircraft that have become lost to history.

Back when eBay was in full swing in time to a vigorous economy they were a good source of regular sales in the $10.00 to $20.00 range with occasional “oh wow!” surprise bidding wars.  One of the beauties of postcards is that you often get duplications in lots purchased.  On those occasions I kept one copy for my personal collection and sold the other.  It can be a hobby that pays for itself.

Trains are another universal favorite.  They suited early photographers because they were good still subjects.  Quite a few early cards featured train wrecks.

Later on when cameras got better at stopping motion trains were often captured moving through dramatic scenery.   The railroad companies found postcards to be a handy advertising medium.  As a result a lot of railroad history is preserved for both scholars and railfans.

The hunt for old postcards is fun because so many people saved the cards informally. You find them in desk drawers and pigeonholes, in shoe boxes and coffee cans. They appear to have been the number one bookmark of all time.  They often come as part of a stack of paper items perhaps meant to be scrapbook material. You can find some good old advertising items, trade cards, tobacco cards, or small engravings.

It seems like printed cards of all types become handy items to trade.  Barter and baseball cards is practically a rite of passage for American children.  The value of post cards varies widely, naturally, the older the better. Condition counts a lot. It’s not unusual to have messages written on the front of early cards as the postal regulations reserved the back of the card for addresses only.  Tears and bends are what really downgrade a card.

When I started selling collectibles postcards came on to my radar screen along with vintage photographs.  They go hand-in-hand.  So much history was preserved at the same time that it was made accessible to the public.  We take that aspect for granted in the internet age.  At the time postcards were invented America was a largely rural society.  Radio was largely theoretical and the modern marvel of the day in personal transportation was the bicycle; another worthy topic for a post card collection.  You have the advantage to explore a century and more of our world unfolding before you in a handy format that is very user friendly.  Hitch a ride on history and be transported.

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Antique Auctions, Live and Online With a Lot of Zip.

7 August 2010

I don’t have access to an auction house of any sorts where I live.  The nearest one is about 79 miles away.  However, I really miss it and only stay away because it involves to much time and gasoline.  Thanks to this intriguing bit of technology we call the internet I may have found the solution.  On a recent visit to a local used car lot I entered the sales office and saw something wonderful.  the owner of the business has recently become a dad.  There he was sitting at his desk with baby on lap, watching and participating in the automobile auction he used to attend in person.  It seemed like an elegant solution to a modern problem.  One which I could borrow.

With a little searching I found Auction Zip.com.  This well put together web site brings together auctioneers from all over the United States.  The auctions are live webcasts so it’s like being there.  You can log in at the time of the auction or place a prior absentee bid.  I have to give this a try and will post a story if and when I get the chance.

I previewed some ephemera auctions and was basically satisfied with the format displaying the items offered.  It could be improved a bit with the use of thumbnail images giving more screen room for better browsing.  You can search the site somatroph hgh by subject matter and can probably find just about anything you want.  Be aware that most auctions seem to have a buyer’s premium and sometimes an extra little online fee.  the auction houses are responsible for shipping anything you win and will tack on shipping charges accordingly.

In going over the list of auctioneers I recognized a bunch of those which I regularly attended back east.  It was kind of nostalgic.  This new forum does lack some of the old familiar ambiance.  Like cheap hot dogs from the snack bar and crotchety local dealers whispering their deals in the back of the room and dour looking Amish men fresh from working the fields.  Just to get that authentic feeling, try sitting in front of the computer on a steel folding chair.  If it’s summer turn on the heat and reduce the ventilation in the room.  If it’s winter position yourself to catch a frigid draft every time someone opens the door.  Get your least favorite relatives to come and go through those doors frequently over the course of the auction.  It’s the next best thing to being there.

Maybe the good old days are getting better.  Give it a try.  Many of us are all old dogs and the new tricks are coming thick and fast.  Now all we need is an economy that keeps pace with our capacity for innovation.

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Selling for Free On Ebay Update, How are You Doing?

5 July 2010

We are well along in the current eBay free listing opportunity.  How are you doing?  I’d like to know if there are lots of people taking advantage of this or is everyone just kicking back enjoying the fireworks and beer. I have been busy posting auctions.  As of this writing I have 23 active auctions.  I have kept all of the starting prices low.  About half are relisted items that i would like to clear out of inventory.

I started posting on Sunday and added several more today.  I will probably put a few more into gear tomorrow.  I never seem to have good luck with items posted later in the week than Tuesday.  If you are interested in what i am offering check my member ID, gwynnsmom.  I have no bids yet but there are a bunch of watchers and page views.  The real action happens at the end anyway, so I’m feeling good right now.

My favorite item is the Naval Air technical training Center photo book.  I wrote a post about it when I first offered it for sale and I am surprised it is still hanging around.   Write a comment and share your experience.  Tell us what you have high hopes for or what is just a dog you hope to shed soon.  Have a happy Fourth of July.  I hope you all make the big bucks.  It’s the American way.

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You’re Only as Antique as You Feel

30 March 2010

We draw a certain meaning from any work we do. One can’t be in the antique business and not think about time and aging.  You constantly handle artifacts from simpler eras.  Many dealers are old-timers who have been in the game a long time and know how much it has changed.  The insight I have drawn from antiquing is a change in the pace of life.  Thank you, industrial revolution!

Collecting antiques and displaying them in our homes is a recognition that we value history.  Estate sales  are glimpses into the past as lived by ordinary people with sometimes extraordinary bits of residue from historic moments.

I once knew a dealer who bought an old bottle at an estate sale in the Pennsylvania coal regions.  He was intrigued by the french inscription etched in the glass and the thick black liquid sealed inside with a crystal stopper.  It turned out to be oil drained from the engine of the Spirit of St. Louis at Le Bourget  airport.  When Lindbergh landed, the mob that greeted him began to take bits and pieces of the plane as souvenirs. Police had to guard it through the night.

Today’s advertising can be overwhelming, even annoying.  You will find any antique mall  and many shops to be chock full of old advertising treated as high art.  The multitudinous tins and bottles of kitchen and other household products are equally celebrated for their rarity and quaintness.  Back in the sixties we rebellious types bemoaned our materialistic throwaway society.  No archeology site is complete without it’s midden.  We celebrate junk by viewing it in a new light.

The average antique shop is not a palace of treasured items built by the best craftsman of times past.  genuine Chippendale is apt to already be in a museum or some stinking rich guys mansion.  Instead we have the horse collar from the days of slow transportation,  The typewriter from the days of slow communication, soda fountain stools from the days before fast food.  When my father was a boy no aircraft flew past the speed of sound. When my Grandfather was a boy there were no airplanes.  He plowed with a horse  and when he grew up he took a slow boat to Europe to fight in The Great War.

Maybe the slower pace of the past meant less luxury and harder work.  Although the reports I see on the news are indicating that Americans spend more time at work and of course the two wage earner family is becoming a necessity in this economy.  We are definitely on the go  and have adapted to a hurried lifestyle.

This became apparent to me a couple of years ago when I found myself in a situation where I was required to use an old rotary dial phone.  They were the only thing available in my world until about 1968.  I placed my finger in the hole corresponding to the first number and rotated the dial.  Then I let it return to the starting position.  This continued for all eight digits in the telephone number.  Half way through this process it occurred to me that the whole thing was very annoying.  Why should I be annoyed at a stupid old phone?

It wasn’t the effort of dialing that put me off.  My fingers were not weak.  I didn’t lack faith that the call would go through.  It was simply having to wait for the dial to return to the starting position before dialing the next number.  It was robbing me of precious seconds.  So, how pathetic am I?  I wonder if my Grandson will look back on the cell phone and think, ” how quaint?  Imagine pushing all those buttons.  Where did they find the time?”

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